Audio Book Review: I Can’t Make This Up

This book is longer than you think this is, let me tell you. DO NOT UNDERESTIMATE COMEDIANS.

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So I made the mistake of thinking I’d be able to catch up on 2 seasons of Thrones, read a book, work on this blog, finish this particular audio book, plus do all I was during my 16 day vacation last month. Obviously we saw how that went. So I finally finished Kevin Hart’s I Can’t Make This Up audio book last night.

If you know who Kevin Hart is, his book (especially the audio version) is nothing short of anything that Kevin produces. He even has some commentary from his dad put into it, and him trying to narrate it is just as amusing as his comedy specials and clips.

If you don’t know who Kevin Hart is, please, just stop here, go watch his stuff, ANYTHING REALLY, even if it’s on YouTube. You’ve probably seen his face on some GIF reactions IRL (well, on the internet IRL).

This book is the story of his life. It doesn’t just stop at his fame. He goes through his upbringing, his trouble with his now ex-wife that was a long up and down roller coaster type of relationship, to his career, and even the downfalls of his character (and still makes it amusing, because we can all relate somehow).

It’s everything you think it’d be, if you’ve seen any of his comedy specials. Listening to him narrate it, I think makes it. It adds his personality better, and his style. So if you’re debating on just reading it or listening to it, I 100% recommend the audio version. Grant it, I’m totally biased since I didn’t read it, but listened to it.

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Evil in America: Another Book Review

To add another book review to my list this year for you guys, I finally finished June’s book.

Since we’re in Mercury retrograde, and I’m taking time off of social media, I can tend to the things that I truly want to tend to. Not like I couldn’t do those things anyway, and I should get better about managing future aspirations and betterment and mindless scrolling of social media that doesn’t do much other than either smiles or frowns.

Now let’s get into the book review instead of babbling about pointless stuff. You probably came here to read my commentary and thoughts about the book and not tangents. The book was, you guessed it: Evil in America.

I do regularly listen to Shapiro’s podcast and occasionally read the articles he writes, when they come up on my Google homepage for recommended reads. With that, you would think that by now I would have read at least one of his books already. Nope, this is my first.

He has an interesting take on things, and that shows in his writing. I like how he took, in Evil in America, each “chapter” was a headline or big topic happening at the time he wrote it. He shared the date for when he wrote the commentary as well. It’s a good reminder for those of us reading it later in time.

Not like we don’t necessarily recall those events (some I didn’t know about because I wasn’t so politically involved at the time), but putting a date with it, helps file it better in our brains like “Oh, okay, that’s when that was”.

Shapiro has a new book he’s currently working on and will be due out in 2019, and I plan on getting it.

Audio Book Review: Wisdom of Sundays

I’ve never really gotten into Oprah, but I know she’s so influential, and love her vibe, for what I’ve listened, heard, and saw of her. Awhile back, Aileen from Lavendaire said that she had listened to the audio book of Oprah’s Wisdom of Sundays, taken from her series on her network.

I chose my first of two audiable credits I had, to listen to Wisdom of Sundays as well. It was no better time to listen to this, right before my trip to California. I’ll be sharing more on how I planned that on Monday! Anyway, I truly suggest, as a fan or not so much fan, to go listen to these conversations she shares in this audio book.

Truly, this book is something that was perfectly placed into my life, and made it’s way into my life, at no better of a time.

Oprah’s best life style shines through this whole book, which really isn’t a book, but filled with best life tips, tricks, and “Ah-ha!” moments we should all experience. I would love to get into watching or listening to more of the Super Soul Sunday conversations because of this book.

Oprah shares her conversations with people like Gary Zukav, my next re-read author (which I next to never re-read) Ekhart Tolle, and one of the last ones on her list, Daniel Pink. I love the idea that that conversation brought: every great person/influencer has a sentence or catch that we remember them for.

Throughout this book, every time that Oprah talks about gratitude and her gratitude journal, I keep telling myself that I need to get back into doing my daily gratitude. I was doing so well, doing 5 a day, and kind of lost track of it. This is a habit that I wanted to cultivate this year, and I’m not doing it as much as I should.

Also, while listening to this whole book, over the course of many days, I am brought back to mindfulness and self awareness. When I say I needed this book, at this exact point in my life, I mean it. The mindfulness brought to light in the conversation of John Kabat-Zin was the start of everything I needed in this book. When he says “When you’re making pasta, and stirring the sauce, JUST STIR THE SAUCE”

The next conversation that hit me was the one with Reverand Bacon (I think that’s his name…chapter 4 of the audio book…listed as chapter 5 because of the intro being a “chapter”, for reference).

Their take on vibrations, and how what you do, say, and surround yourself with, creates your vibration and energy. When you tweak or mess with one (or when one messes with you), the others are affected. It makes sense on why I have a lot of the desires that I do, wanting to branch out and move on, in terms of my work, let alone who I want to keep around me.

I’ve been on the journey of filtering out or limiting the energies that don’t vibe with mine, either as they come, or the ones that have been around too long and need to go. Frankly, most of that has been dealt with, so it’s just a “deal with it as it arises” sort of thing.

My next “Ah-ha” moment came just a little over a chapter later in the listen. Commentary on the idea of “the opposite of poverty isn’t wealth, but justice”. What justice are you doing for yourself? With that

As I listened to Oprah’s conversation with Elie Wisel at the end of her book, the first minute broke my heart. Any survivor of that type of horror brings my feels out, and knowing that his heartbreak of his sister dying during the Nazi reign makes me feel the sad feels. Anything like that, sad feels doesn’t even cut it for my pain, and I didn’t even loose someone from those wars.

Wiesel had written about 50 books, and he is best noted for saying “The opposite of love is not hate, but indifference”, which is remarkable. Looking through his list of books is what I HAVE to do over the next while, and add to my ever-growing list of books to read.

He passed away just under 2 years ago, and may his soul truly rest easy.

This audio book is a MUST READ/LISTEN. I grasp why those who recommend it, recommend it. When you need hope, when you need inspiration, when you need ideas, when you are in need of “Ah-Ha” moments, get this audio book. Listen to this when you are short on yourself, when you need something to pull you out of yourself, out of your mind.

This will be a listen frequently. This will be at least an annual listen, like what I’m making the Power of Now from Tolle, and Tuesdays with MorrieTuesdays with Morrie by Albom.

I’ve never been the type to re-read books. But as of late (the last 2 years really), I’ve turned into one of those. My first re-read was Tuesdays with Morrie, hence my desire of talking with “older” people, and wanting to turn it into a podcast.

The Power of Now hit me so hard last year that I couldn’t help but want and near NEED to put it on a re-read list. Listening to Wisdom of Sundays has done the same thing. 12 Rules for Life is on my re-read list as well.

 

Controversial Books: May 2018 Book Review

This month, I read “Dangerous” by Milo Yiannopoulos. Yes, I had to Google his name to spell it…you would’ve too. This is my actual read, and not an audiobook read. I’ve turned to audiobooks as of late, and I’m no longer ashamed.

I do get rather sidetracked, looking stuff up when I’m busy, versus actually reading up on things. I also love the convenience of audiobooks when I’m doing mundane tasks, because it makes it all the less boring. One day I’ll be making enough money, where I’m not working where I am now. In the mean time, I have to make do with that time I have.

Anyway, instead of making this a sob story/pity party, let’s get into this book review! Dangerous has been out since Independence Day 2017, after LOADS of issues and controversy. What event of Milo’s doesn’t include such a thing though?

Yes, this is written by that Milo. That flaming gay conservative who married a black guy?!?! YES THAT MILO. He’s gay, and he’s every bit of that gay stereotype, with no guilt whatsoever of it. Kudos to him. Especially since he’s conservative, and pissing off the left, since he’s every ounce of that flaming 80’s homosexual:

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That’s all the background you need of him…really. And if need more, read the book haha!

So, let’s get into the book review, shall we?

Milo goes into the reasons why certain groups hate him. Not only that, he goes into why they don’t like him-he picks apart their more popular arguments/stances, and why they don’t stick, if you actually give it some sunlight. Half of it is sarcastic remarks or jokes, and the rest is points, in a mostly light manner.

There’s 9 chapters/groups that hate him, that he goes into, in the fashion above. The notable list is: the progressive left, the alt right (both poles of the horseshoe), Twitter, Feminists (more so the new wave), BLM, the Media, establishment Gays and Republicans (not the same chapter though), and Muslims.

Then there’s a chapter about why one group DOESN’T hate him: gamers.

The last chapter is about how awesome his college tour speeches are.

Personally, I enjoyed his commentary on how awful some of his “haters'” points are. Even his commentary on why modern feminists (see these books: Female Spectacle  Feminism) don’t like him, and his take on abortion. Yes even his take on abortion. 

Half of the commentary in the BLM chapter is also amusing as well. The same reason we laugh at the small amount of people who blame Jews for what’s going wrong in America, and what’s going on, is what’s happening when blacks blame the whites in America for the same things.

Yes, sure, there’s issues still, but how you handle the issues dealt to you, is up to you, and that includes you trying to blame someone else for your misfortune, sadly. The reason why whites land up better, and Jews better yet, is because of how they keep at things, and look at their issues and shortcomings.

If I gave you any more glimpse into Milo’s book, I’d fear that I’d have a plagiarism and copyright lawsuit on my hands!

The way Milo’s book reads, is nothing less than the troll-f*ckery that you’d expect out of him. Even though Milo and Ben Shapiro don’t get along, I’ll turn around next month and read one of Shapiro’s many books. “Which one?” you ask… Well that’s for next month for me to tell!

 

Audio Book Review: Eat. Pray. Love.

When YouTuber Kalyn Nicholson says that this will make a travel bug crawl into your soul, she was right!

This week, I’m sharing my review on none other than Eat, Pray, Love. Go grab it, and re-read it (or just read it!). If you’re not a book reader, check out the movie here.

Elizabeth took us around the world. I loved all three parts of the book, or really each “mini-book”, in which the three countries could be their own mini book. Eat and Love were my two.

I could so see myself gaining the same 30 pounds she did in Italy. I also fell in love with her trip to Bali as well. Bali was where she found love, but I don’t think just in the romance way.

You’d think she’d find romance in Italy (which she kind of did), but it wasn’t the romance she needed or deserved. She had to find herself again, create that spark again, to truly find her kind of romance.

In Bali, she seemed to find her love of people, of culture again. She could also keep her love of travel as well, as you’ll see towards the end of the book.

That’s the most basic of all basic summaries, and as much as I would love to totally spoil the whole book for you (assuming you haven’t read it, which, if I can say this nicely: GO FREAKING READ IT!), I won’t.

If it’s been awhile since you read this lovely book, make sure that you can do it on a beach or wherever you find a fancy, and dive right back in! You’ll enjoy it as much as the first time around, I promise.

 

Wine Wednesday: The House by the River Review

Do you recall two weeks ago when I did a review on 2 books for World Book Day? Well, here’s the third book’s review that I got during those days of free e-books and super cheap audiobook versions because I have the eBook version.

My two books for World book day were Last Train to Istanbul and A River in Darkness. Go check them both out, on top of going to my World book day post, if you want my opinions on them.

I’ve truly fallen in love with audiobooks lately. My “day job” is so dull, and to listen to podcasts and books make my job more bearable. I’m aiming this month, to decrease my spending, and get more income, through working with people who may lower my costs of things I can enjoy, and things I can’t dodge paying (mainly the electric bill, for now…stay tuned for that!).

Anyway, let’s get into this review for ya’ll. It’s been too long since World Book Day, and I told you I’d read/listen and share my thoughts.

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This little love story is the story of a woman’s 5 girls who all left her, 4 out of love for a man, that would each take them to different places outside of their small town, and their house by the river. The last girl went out on her own journey, as she went after her passion instead of love like the other sisters.

Going through the book, you take each girl’s journey, and like the girls, you almost forget about the mother, who lost each one of her children, until they get into a situation where they miss and feel the need to go back to the house by the river, but are too ashamed to go back to there.

You can see most of their struggles, and see where they should’ve gone back, or at least dove deeper into their adult relationship with their mother.

This book is a perfect lead up/reminder for Mother’s Day (at least those who participate in it). As someone who only knows the daughter side of things, and only seeing my own mother a handful of times in the almost decade, this is such a reminder of what my mother might see things.

With some of the girls’ struggles in their personal lives, I’ve also seen where my own relationships could go. The advice that the girls’ mother, let alone the influential people they meet along the way, is everything a young woman needs to hear, let alone reflect on.

If you’re interested in the book, visit:
physical copy
ebook
audio version

Try audiable if you aren’t sure about it, or haven’t yet! It’s great for long commutes (personally, over a half hour each way), or if your job is as dull as mine is, and you can at least somewhat get away with audio books. Each book you get, you keep, regardless if you keep your membership. I’ve paused mine a couple times, and enjoy re-listening to some books.

A lot of my older books were cheaper since I had the book in my kindle app, and I only had listened to so much of the book, versus reading it. Half the time, if I can’t get into a book, but want to finish it, I’ll grab the audio version and listen to it at work and it’s made the world of difference!

What fiction books have you been reading lately? Do you like reading books (physical or ebook) or do you like audio books better? I’d like to hear, so I can read/listen, review, and share on here!

See all the books I’ve read or listened to below:
House by the River
A River in Darkness
Last Train to Instanbul

April Book Review: 101 Secrets for Your Twenties

This month was an easy-styled read for me, since I’ve been struggling with the reading bandwagon. I know with my “reading” of the World Book Day books I got from Amazon, it seems like I’m rocking it this month. Well, I guess I have, but in the same time, sitting down to read a book is so challenging sometimes.

But hey, most of it’s me, who procrastinates on taking a shower in the morning, even though I know it helps my morale, going from working that night, to whatever I have set aside for myself during the morning.

For April’s read, I had penciled in 101 Secrets for Your 20’s, which hey- if you didn’t know: I’m a 20-something! (no really, I am). I loved the format, from the moment I took a look into it, earlier this month.

Each secret is its own chapter, and sometimes, it’s just even the secret itself! Just from what I’ve said, plus given the title, it’s a very straight-forward read.

One of my early on favorites was the rule of “Don’t cram your plot line into someone else’s story”. Grant it, we’ve heard a variation of this before, but I love the language he used for this.

There’s not much more I can say about this book, other than go read it, if you want to have a good laugh down memory lane (if you’re past this 20’s phase), or need some good ol’ tips, during your twenties, if you’re struggling (or not….I don’t know).

If anything, you can surely grab a few tips, and shove them down a friend’s face when they need it!