Evil in America: Another Book Review

To add another book review to my list this year for you guys, I finally finished June’s book.

Since we’re in Mercury retrograde, and I’m taking time off of social media, I can tend to the things that I truly want to tend to. Not like I couldn’t do those things anyway, and I should get better about managing future aspirations and betterment and mindless scrolling of social media that doesn’t do much other than either smiles or frowns.

Now let’s get into the book review instead of babbling about pointless stuff. You probably came here to read my commentary and thoughts about the book and not tangents. The book was, you guessed it: Evil in America.

I do regularly listen to Shapiro’s podcast and occasionally read the articles he writes, when they come up on my Google homepage for recommended reads. With that, you would think that by now I would have read at least one of his books already. Nope, this is my first.

He has an interesting take on things, and that shows in his writing. I like how he took, in Evil in America, each “chapter” was a headline or big topic happening at the time he wrote it. He shared the date for when he wrote the commentary as well. It’s a good reminder for those of us reading it later in time.

Not like we don’t necessarily recall those events (some I didn’t know about because I wasn’t so politically involved at the time), but putting a date with it, helps file it better in our brains like “Oh, okay, that’s when that was”.

Shapiro has a new book he’s currently working on and will be due out in 2019, and I plan on getting it.

Advertisements

Wine Wednesday: Nelson Mandela

This is Nelson Mandela’s 100th birthday. I took a poll on my social media platforms about interest on him and the Mandela effect. I got good feedback on ya’ll wanting to know about him, and more so about the Mandela effect. So cue the research, the playlist, the drinks, and ALL OF THE READING.

I’ll keep his background short for ya’ll, since it seems like the Mandela effect is what is most of interest. If you want an in depth background to his story, check out this book.

To get all of the generics out of the way, Nelson Mandela was born literally 100 years ago (July 18th, 1918) in a small South African village, in the Eastern Capes of South Africa. He died early December of 2013 in Johannesburg, South Africa. Yes, this is where the Mandela effect comes into play.

He had 3 different wives, the last one being his wife until he passed away. He had a son that passed away before he did as well, which is interesting to me (car accident). In all, he had 5 children, and over 30 awards for a varying of reasons. He also had 9 other siblings, which I don’t feel as uprising, but being an only child myself, I find just simply find interesting.

Let’s get into what ya’ll came here for, shall we? As in that good ol’ Mandela effect, how it came about, and some things that have happened since this became a thing.

The reason I gave some backstory to Nelson Mandela, is simply because of the Mandela effect. If you don’t know the basics of the Mandela effect, well…honey, you’re gonna learn real quick here.

The phenomenon that has come to be known as the Mandela effect is the idea or fact that a collective of people remember/recall an event or thing taking place, only for that said thing to happen some good chunk of time later. It can also include mass though on something as simple as a catchphrase or viral theme/thing catching on, when a collective does the same thing, and think that this had already become a thing. Think of it as a variation of deja vu.

Now I know there’s the technical term of the Mandela effect (False Memory Syndrome…mainly explored by Psychologist Sigmund Freud. Yes, the same guy who was all about sexual behaviors), but one thing my stepmom brought up recently, in a car ride, is: what was the Mandela effect, before the Mandela effect?

Why is it called the Mandela effect though? The main reason is half because he was so prominent, and the other because people thought that he had died while he was serving time in prison (read his prison letters here), in the 1980’s. Looking back at his life, he held presidency, had SO MANY international awards, and did quite a bit for about 30 years from the time he “died” until he actually died.

This isn’t a matter of things like the “cloning” or replicating of a person sort of thing. It’s raw deja vu on a mass populous. I’ve even had this experience, even lately. I had to ask my better half about YouTube’s dark screen mode lately. Asking him was my most recent spell of it, like a planet retrograde.

My main question(s) is: Why do so many of us have so many Mandela effect memories, what causes it, and why does it happen to so many people, with different upbringings, origins, and life choices? Do you have any thoughts?

Do you want to watch some Mandela effect videos? Check out Shane Dawson‘s series on his channel here and Hailey Reese’s spin off series here.

Remember to check out the reads listed in this post:
Nelson Mandela’s autobiography
Nelson Mandela’s prison letters

 

World Book Day 2018: What I Read

Going through the Google suggested articles on my phone (open your chrome app, and as long as your home page is google.com, or on google.com, scroll down, you can read suggested articles), I had an article that today was going to be World Book Day, and Amazon was giving away 9 books from around the world, translated into English for the 9 days leading up to today.

Who wouldn’t take a look at the list? Unfortunately, I think a lot. I got 3 books off the list, and got the audiobook version for $2 each, so I could partake in this day. It’s also nice to learn about other cultures, and what others went through. Fiction or true story, I’m sharing my review on 2 of the books given for free: “A River in Darkness” by Masaji Ishikawa, and “The Last Train to Istambul” by Ayse Kulin. The other one I’ll do another post on soon.

I spent most of what I could of Wednesday and Thursday last week, listening to the first book, and took my time up until today, to listen to the second. Why? Because the second one IS. SO. LONG.

Screenshot_20180419-071739

So I’ll start with “A River in Darkness”. It’s a true story from a guy who was half Korean, half Japanese, whose father got the promise of North Korea becoming a nation of its own, a paradise, which fell through. The family moved to North Korea, even though the dad was born in the south.

He stayed there through his parents’ passing, in the 90’s, and had his own family there as well. After he couldn’t afford to keep raising his family with the “lowest of low” status he had, as a Japanese man, he tries to deflect, and makes it into China, and makes it to the consulate, to try to make it back to his home, Japan, to hopefully save his family as well.

Hearing him go through the troubles he did, with hearing his parent’s death, years apart, while seeing his sister pregnant out of wedlock, to his issues with moving just from China back to Japan, is something. I even wrote in my gratitude journal, that I was glad (and am glad) and grateful for the fact that I grew up here in the States.

Listening to this story, helps me connect a bit with the distaste that the Japanese people had against Koreans, especially the North. My dad grew up in Japan, as a white boy, and was discriminated against, and grew up knowing some of these distastes of Koreans, still affecting him to this day, I’m sure.

Now let’s dive into the other book I listened to: “Last Train to Istanbul”.

Screenshot_20180419-075117

I’m so glad that I went for the audio book version of this! Kindle suggests a 9 hour reading time, and a 12 hour listening time, but OMG my attention span would make the reading time like 20 hours, I’m sure of it. But I got through just under half of it, by listening to it, just in the first “session”, during my first day back at my mundane job.

You follow a few different families, during both world wars, and it’s truly so much to take in. Hearing their differences, how they came together in their own family, for whatever reason, to eventually come to a lot of the same fears, for different reasons, is so amazing.

I can tell you though, that the second half (really the last third, just about) makes the book. The first third feels like it’s going on forever, and the second third has some “meat” to it, but the last third is where you see all of the characters’ stories come together, on that journey to Turkey. The journey to get to the train, and the train ride, you really feel their anxieties, from each stop, to while they’re blatantly going through Berlin, like if half of them weren’t Jewish, is something else. It really does end on a bittersweet note as well.

Learning and appreciating different cultures is not something that is to be frowned upon. It’s the same thing we need to do about other cultures and countries, that we need to do the same with history. They go hand in hand. So please, read, listen, and talk to others who may have lived a little differently than you. And of course, share yours when the time comes as well, with those who want to learn about yours.